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ROBERTA POLFUS
Roberta Polfus Ceramics
Oak Park, IL 60302
(708) 383-3651
Instagram.com/robertapolfus

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My carved and sometimes gestural pieces are intimate forms that fit and feel good in the hand. While they are generally not representations of actual objects, they reflect the shapes, patterns, colors and surfaces that I am drawn to in nature—the petals of an apple blossom, the grooves of a spindle shell, the pattern of a hosta leaf or the texture of a weathered rock all inform and inspire my work.

I use a combination of wheel thrown and hand-built forms that are altered, carved and sprigged. With a variety of airbrushed matte and gloss glazes that enhance the surfaces, the pieces are fired in a gas kiln, cone 10 reduction.

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ELIZABETH BOGGESS
519 4th Street
Galena, Illinois 61036
(512) 971-2289
ebog1249@gmail.com

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I met my husband Richard Hess (who is a member of 20 Dirty Hands) 32 years ago in Ithaca, NY. I went to shows with him and when asked if I was an artist, I always said no, I was his technical support person…not an artist. Richard was a willing and good teacher and taught me the basics of hand building and we enjoyed being in the studio together. During our 20 years in Austin, Texas we had a teaching studio, and it was during that time that I started a clay group with three of his students.  We did shows and enjoyed the time we spent working with clay. Richard and I also taught pottery to many, many groups of Girl Scouts and Brownies while we were in Texas.

 

We moved to Galena, Illinois in 2014, set up our pottery studio and once again, I have had fun spending time experimenting with clay. I started making my little houses and have had fun with the shapes and the surprises that come from raku firings. The clay is extruded, and each house is shaped by hand. The house form is intriguing, and the finished product always makes me smile.

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Scott Steder grew up in the suburbs of Chicago and received his Associates in Art from Harper College in 2009. It was during this time he was inspired to pursue a life as a ceramic artist and teacher. Shortly after, he finished a BFA in Ceramics from Northern Illinois University and continued on to a Post-Baccalaureate from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Following his time in Knoxville he was accepted as an artist in residence at the Cub Creek Foundation in Appomattox, Virginia. For ten months, he and fellow resident artists lived in an isolated environment where they built and fired wood kilns, processed clay, and developed bodies of work.


In the spring of 2014 he was accepted into the Wichita State University MFA program. During his time in Wichita he traveled Japan, Korea, Taiwan and to Paraguay to build a large wood fired kiln for the Annual Asuncion Biennial. He was also awarded a Graduate Student Fellowship from NCECA for his investigation of local ceramic material in Kansas. Scott did a short residency in Joshua Tree National Forest, and was a visiting artist at Southern Indiana University and AMOCA Ceramics Studio in Pomona, CA. Since his time at Northern Illinois he has shown work all across the country including the NCECA National Student Juried Exhibition in Providence, RI and Beyond the Brickyard at the Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, MT.


Steder graduated in 2017 and is now living in Platteville, WI with his wife, son, and stepson. He is a  lecturer at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville where Scott heads the ceramic department, teaches drawing, 3D design, sculpture, public art, and printmaking classes. In the fall of 2017 he initiated the first annual Platteville empty bowls project and has been working to create stronger bonds between the arts and the community.

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DELORES FORTUNA
fortunapottery.com
delores@fortunapottery.com
FB: delores.fortuna
IG: deloresfortuna

2022 Shows and Exhibitions

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Forming function, a dance, often a tug of war, between though and object making. Add to this dialogue the sheer joy of working with clays as materially responsive as porcelain and surfaces only possible through glaze fusion. A dynamic is created which becomes a life-long fascination. My work uses basic wheel thrown shapes as starting points, altering and rejoining forms articulated by black slip inlay. The clays and glazes I use are often of my own formulation, fired to stoneware temperatures (2374°F) in a gas reduction fiber kiln. My glazes are food safe, microwaveable and dishwashing stable.

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PAUL MAREK

Rockford, IL

(815) 988-9848

thehandypainter@comcast.net

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After 25 years I am just beginning to understand who I am as a potter. I concentrate on refined, carefully shaped forms where the feel of the clay, the speed of the wheel, and my thoughts on that day combine to create a bowl, a cup, a teapot. Each creation is as individual and unique as each leaf of a tree.

 

Then to impart the spontaneity and beauty of nature I fire with wood or soda, a process I find continually fascinating. No two pieces are ever alike. The fire warps, adds colors and drips of glass, and though sometimes frustrating, ultimately I hope it provides a beautiful and functional result.

Winter Rye

winter rye
1522 Oak Park Avenue

Berwyn, IL 60402

winterrye.com

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Patrice Murtha began working in clay 20 years ago. She works with an eye toward simple, refined forms that are, first and foremost, functional. Patrice’s pottery is the foundation of the collaboration known as Winter Rye. Barbara Korbel was introduced to weaving 30 years ago, she designs and weaves cloth, sourcing traditional patterns. Her hand woven table linens complement the colors and forms of Winter Rye pottery. Recently, Barbara began carving spoons to accompany Patrice’s dinnerware.

 

Patrice and Barbara are the founders of Winter Rye. They are committed to making their goods affordable, while honoring the labor of the individual worker. They are proudly based in Berwyn, Illinois. 

Shumpei Yamaki
173 Cedar Muscatine RD  
West Branch, IA  52358
(347) 633-1533
shumpei.yamaki@gmail.com
ShumpeiYamaki.com

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ARTIST BIO

Shumpei Yamaki was born and raised in Kamakura, Japan. He moved to Philadelphia in 1996 to study dance. He went on to pursue a bachelor's degree in archaeology at the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse. In 1999, Shumpei was injured in an automobile accident and enrolled in a ceramics class as physical therapy for his arm. He discovered his passion for ceramics, and in 2001 began an apprenticeship under Richard Bresnahan. He learned traditional Japanese pottery techniques, wood-firing, and ways to rely on local resources and resource conservation.


Shumpei went on to graduate studies at the University of Iowa, in 2002, taking full advantage of their strong wood-fire program. In 2005, Shumpei moved to Brooklyn and participated in wood-firings in upstate New York with Tim Rowan and Roger Baumann. Since he returned to Iowa in 2009, He has built his own designed anagama style wood-fire kiln and been experimenting with local clay in his personal endeavors as a wood-fire potter. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT

I feel free to communicate with my own language through art. Direct action in the process of creating art is the key to communicating effectively. Results of my action reflect my inner perception.
 

Initially I came to the United States to see the origin of street dance. Learning street dance has taught me how to communicate with others visually and emotionally. My former experience in Hip-Hop culture and Capoeira (Afro-Brazilian martial art) still exists in my body and soul, blending with and influencing my wheel throwing techniques. When I dance, I dance with flow and force. I dance to express my primitive spirit, and my intuition is exactly what I feel at that moment, completely removed from myself.
 

I view clay on the pottery wheel as a sort of stage for myself as a dancer. When water flows on the surface of clay on a pottery wheel, my hands dance to rhythm and my mind stretches into meditation. Imagination and feelings about clay and water take me to a state of mind as "second nature". As street dance and clay combine through me, the true primitive concepts of these two art forms communicate themselves to the audience; one is ephemeral, the other is permanent.